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Location:  401 S. Mill Avenue
Survey Number: HPS-241
Year Built: 1900
Architectural Style: Victorian / Neo-Classical

SUMMARY
The Andre Building is significant for its association with R. G. Andre, a prominent Tempe businessman; and for its design, combining both Victorian Panel Brick Commercial and Neo-Classical elements. It is one of Tempe's finest examples of Victorian and Neo-Classical architecture.

B: PERSONS
The Andre Building is significant for its association with R. G. Andre, a skilled saddle maker and prominent businessman in early Tempe. While living in Phoenix, he built a commercial building at the southwest corner of Mill and 4th Street in 1888, and opened a saddle and harness shop. In 1893 Andre moved to Tempe and later partnered with M. Mertz in Andre and Mertz, specializing in harnesses, saddles, and vehicles. The Andre Building burned in 1899, but Andre built a new building on same site in the following year. The 1900 building was constructed in partnership with C. G. Jones. In 1902, Andre sold the property to C.G. Jones, whose family owned it until 1977. In addition to Andre's hardware and harness shop, the Andre Building has housed a number of businesses, including Price Wickliffe's Furniture and Undertaker (1912-1929), the Southside Progress newspaper (1939-1942), and the Arizona Cotton Growers Association (1919). The second floor has been a boarding house and apartments. The building has also been the location for the U.S. Post Office (1917-1947) and the Masonic Lodge (1917-1953). The City purchased the property in 1977. The Andre Building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. In 1981, the exterior of the building was restored to its original appearance. The building again suffered fire damage in 1999, but structural and fire safety improvements in the 1981 rehabilitation contributed to its survival.

C: ARCHITECTURE
The Andre Building is significant as one of Tempe's finest examples of Victorian and Neo-Classical architecture. Its design combines both Victorian Panel Brick Commercial and Neo-Classical elements. Rebuilt in 1900, the building remained true to the original design by prominent territorial architect James M. Creighton. The two-story red brick building has three bays, and the upper floor facade features Neo-Classical details such as pilasters (decorative columns on the wall), a pediment, and a cornice. This is the best-preserved, continuously-used commercial block in the Salt River Valley, retaining a high degree of integrity of its turn-of-the century appearance. As once typical of many two-story commercial buildings, the Andre Building was designed originally for retail uses on first floor and fraternal hall on the second floor.

The Andre Building was individually listed in the National Register of Historic Places on 08/10/1979

This property was classified eligible for listing in the Tempe Historic Property Register on 08/12/2010

The Andre Building HAS NOT been listed in the Tempe Historic Property Register at this time

SOURCES
National Register Nomination, 1979
Last updated: 10/19/2012 11:37:18 AM