Traffic Calming & Streetscape Projects

In order to enhance and preserve the physical character of Tempe and promote accessible transportation options, the city of Tempe instituted several streetscape and bicycle and pedestrian improvement projects. Below is a list of completed projects.

5th Street

5th & Hardy After  5th Street Mosiac

To ensure that residents would be able to get around their neighborhood easily and safely by bicycle, bus or walking while reducing high-speed, cut-through traffic and vehicle emissions the Fifth Street project was implemented from Priest Drive to Farmer Avenue. The overall goals of the project were to:
• reduce traffic volume and speed on Fifth Street
• improve the surrounding environment by incorporating landscaping 
• upgrade pedestrian and bicycle facilities
• improve street drainage

To achieve these goals, the city obtained a federal grant for designing traffic calming and pedestrian enhancements to the street, to reduce the traffic volumes and speeds and improve conditions for pedestrians and bicyclists. In 1995, after widening Priest Drive and opening the Loop 202 freeway entrance, traffic counts on Fifth Street were nearly 10,000 autos per day. The project included narrowed lanes, traffic diverters and traffic chokers, which cut traffic by 40 percent to 6,000 autos per day. The project cost about $3.5 million and was completed in 1999.

13th Street

13th & Mill After  13th & Farmer After

The ¾ mile long project area includes 13th Street between Mill Avenue and Hardy Drive . The overall goal of the traffic-calming project was to make 13th Street a better place for bicyclists and pedestrians by providing improved facilities while reducing the speeds and volumes of vehicular traffic. 

Traffic features of the project included:
• replacing 4 foot sidewalks with 6 foot sidewalks,
• replacing rounded (roll)curbs with vertical curbs,
• providing ADA-compliant ramps,
• adding sidewalk bulbouts at side streets,
• adding 6 foot bike lanes,
• moving overhead utility lines underground,
• adding landscaping to the existing vegetation along the street,
• constructing an artist-designed entry monument, and
• constructing traffic calming measures including four-way stops, speed tables and medians.

Funding sources for the project include Federal CMAQ funds totaling $705,000. The remainder of the funding was obtained from the Tempe Capital Improvements Fund. The approximate total cost for design and construction is $2 million. The project was completed in 2006.

College Avenue

College Avenue 2  College Avenue 3
The busiest bicycle corridor in Arizona, College Avenue connects Apache Boulevard near the ASU campus with the College Avenue bicycle/pedestrian bridge over US 60. The streetscape includes enhanced sidewalk improvements, raised medians, median islands, bicycle lanes, raised intersections, street narrowing and extensive landscaping.

The project has sustainable features like water harvesting, desert landscaping and provides a cooling effect by removing asphalt and adding shade trees.  This project cost $1.6 million and was funded by American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and Tempe Transit Sales Tax monies. The project was completed in 2011.

Mitchell Park East/West

Mitchell Park Chicanes  Mitchell Park

To ensure that residents would be able to get around their neighborhood easily and safely by bicycle, bus or walking while reducing high-speed, cut-through traffic and vehicle emissions the Mitchell Park East/West project was implemented. The project includes traffic circles, chicanes and other traffic calming measures. The project was completed in 2010 and cost $500,000.



Current projects include:

Broadway Road

Hardy Drive

University Drive