McClintock Drive Bike Lane and Repavement (Mill & Overlay) Project

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McClintock with bike    IMG_0430  IMG_0360

In 2015, McClintock Drive between Broadway and Guadalupe roads was repaved as part of Tempe’s ongoing Asset Management Capital Maintenance Program.  As part of this repaving project, McClintock Drive was reconfigured to include bike lanes on each side of the street, which required the removal of at least one vehicle lane on McClintock Drive.  A minimum of two vehicular lanes, northbound and southbound, and a middle turn lane was maintained, as well as medians/center turn lanes and formal turn lanes at the arterial intersections. At the Dec. 15, 2016 City Council meeting, staff was directed to conduct a public input process to present options to the roadway like narrowing travel lanes, widening the street in some areas in order to add an additional vehicle lane, removing the buffer between the traffic lane and bike lane and creating concrete barriers to separate the bike and vehicle lanes.

Public meetings were held March 25, 2017 and March 28, 2017, and online public comment was available March 25 to April 5, 2017. About 150 people attended the March 25 meeting and 275 the March 28 meeting. To view data about bike counts, travel times and traffic counts, click here. 

Materials for June 13, 2017 Transportation Commission Meeting

PowerPoint from March 25 and 28, 2017 public meetings

McClintock Drive Fact Sheet for public comment

Not all alternatives are shown below. These are various alternatives and locations along the corridor. 

Broadway to Southern Alt. 1

Broadway to Southern Alt. 2

Southern to Baseline Alt. 1

Southern to Baseline Alt. 3

Baseline to Guadalupe Alt. 1 

Baseline to Guadalupe Alt. 2

Guadalupe to Western Canal Alt. 1

Guadalupe to Elliot Alt. 2

McNair to Elliot Alt. 1

 

Dec. 15, 2016 City Council Issue Review Session Documents:

Nov. 2016 - Since making changes to McClintock Drive in summer 2015 that included adding bike lanes and removing vehicle lanes, the City of Tempe has been collecting data along with feedback from the public. More than 70 people spoke during the Nov. 3, 2016 City Council Work Study Session telling councilmembers how they feel about the changes, and city staff provided an update on the project including data on use of the bike lanes, traffic volumes and safety. Councilmembers heard a wide variety of opinions from community members, including those who said the bike lanes have made commuting by bicycle safer and more convenient, as well as some nearby residents who said the changes have increased traffic congestion and commute times. Councilmembers discussed options to the roadway like narrowing travel lanes, widening the street in some areas in order to add an additional vehicle lane, removing the buffer between the traffic lane and bike lane and creating concrete barriers to separate the bike and vehicle lanes. Public meeting will occur in late March 2017 to gather additional feedback from residents.  

Nov. 3, 2016 City Council Issue Review Session Documents:

March 17, 2016 City Council Issue Review Session Documents.  At the March 17, 2016 work study session, the Tempe City Council received an update on recent changes made to McClintock Drive that included removing vehicle lanes in order to add separated bike lanes. The report included data on use of the bike lanes, traffic volumes and signal timing, as well as public feedback. In response to the March 17 project update and extensive feedback from residents, the City Council directed staff to continue collecting data and report back in approximately in November with a detailed analysis of the impact. April 8, 2016 follow up memo to Council. 

December 2015: As part of Tempe’s commitment to providing travel options for all modes of transportation, the city built on its recent reconfiguration of McClintock Drive by adding “candlesticks” between bike lanes and vehicle travel lanes. The city installed candlesticks, vertical barriers, along McClintock Drive between Southern Avenue and Baseline Road to create more of a separation between bikes and vehicles.Tempe added the candlesticks as a pilot program to address concerns that drivers are using the bicycle lanes for vehicle travel.  The city is observing driver and bicyclist behavior to determine their effectiveness.

Project History:  McClintock Drive between Broadway and Guadalupe roads has seen traffic volumes, on average, decrease by a total of 22 percent since 2004.  This decrease is largely attributed to the completion of the urban freeway network and an increase in the number of commuters choosing alternative modes of travel. View fact sheet. The addition of bicycle lanes continues Tempe’s longstanding commitment to sustainable transportation and providing streets with accommodations for all modes of travel. The removal of vehicular traffic lane(s) in order to accommodate bicycle lanes is consistent with the Transportation Master Plan, which was approved by the City Council in January 2015 after a year-long public involvement process that identified McClintock Drive as a candidate for bike lanes. Sections of arterials streets that accommodate similar volumes of traffic (25,000-35,000 vehicles/day) with two travel lanes in each direction include: 

  • Warner Road from I-10 to Priest: 31,754 vehicles/day
  • Warner Road from Priest to Kyrene: 31,703 vehicles/day
  • University Drive from McClintock to Loop 101: 30,115 vehicles/day
  • Rural Road from Baseline to Guadalupe: 29,395 vehicles/day
  • Guadalupe Road from Kyrene to Rural: 28,960 vehicles/day
  • University Drive from SR143 to Priest: 28,048 vehicles/day
  • University Drive from Rural to McClintock: 27,360 vehicles/day
  • Warner Road from McClintock to Loop 101: 25,930 vehicles/day
  • Guadalupe Road from McClintock to Loop 101: 25,027 vehicles/day

2015 Paving Schedule

2015 Outreach: Staff notified businesses and neighborhoods adjacent to McClintock Drive by using number of techniques to ensure timely communication including door hangers, social media, street closures web page and press releases. Nesbitt Contracting Co. Inc. was hired to construct the project.  The total project cost was $1,704,547.